Skip to main content

Research

I am currently taking a course in data management and visualization. As part of the course, I am required to keep a blog sharing my experiences. So I am using DocReads to share my findings!

Course 1

Assignment 1

I will be using the dataset from the AddHealth study. Specifically, I will be looking at two variables: conflict resolution training and happiness in school. I am interested only in middle school students, grades 7 and 8.

My research question:
Is there an association between conflict resolution training and happiness in school for middle school students?

My hypothesis:
After examining several recent studies, I believe that there will be a positive correlation between conflict resolution and perceived happiness with school for middle school students.

Literature Review:

Gillies, R. M., & Boyle, M. (2010, 05). Teachers' reflections on cooperative learning: Issues of implementation. Teaching and Teacher Education, 26(4), 933-940. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2009.10.034

In this study, teachers reflected on the experiences they had with implementing cooperative learning (CL) into their classrooms. According to Gillies and Boyle (2010), CL is a "well documented pedagogical practice that promotes academic achievement and socialization" (p. 933), but teachers continue to struggle with fully implementing it into their instruction. Roadblocks to success include: inappropriate socializing, lack of time management, lack of planning, improper group composition, and lack of social skills training. Specifically, the authors identify the need for students to be able to resolve conflict before it derails the progress of the group.


So we know that students working together is a research-based practice that promotes learning. We also know that students in this study did not possess the social skills (including conflict resolution) needed to participate in CL. There is a gap that needs to be addressed.

Parker, A. K. (2010, 01). A Longitudinal Investigation of Young Adolescents’ Self-Concepts in the Middle Grades. RMLE Online, 33(10), 1-13. doi:10.1080/19404476.2010.11462073

Parker (2010) studied 78 middle school students as they entered and then completed middle school. Specifically, Parker looked at five domains of self-concept (academic, social, emotional, physical, and athletic). She found that adolescents initially experience an increase in self-concept, followed by a decline. A key component of this decline is the social self-concept, which she states "...impacts adolescents’ interactions with peers and teachers, their approach to conflict resolution, and their acclimation to the classroom social environment" (p. 3).  

We see here that a positive self-concept (which we can equate with "happiness") is directly related to social interactions, including approach to conflict resolution. So if we can improve conflict resolution skills, we should be able to impact happiness.

Lee, J. (2013). The Effects of Children's Temperament, Parent-child Communication Styles, and Peer Relationships on Children's Happiness. Korean Journal of Human Ecology. (22)5. 433-445. 10.5934/kjhe.2013.22.5.433

In this study, Lee (2013) investigated "the effects of children's temperament, parent-child communication, peer relationships on children's cognitive and affective happiness" (para 1). There were two important findings that directly correlate to my research question: 1) there is a positive association between happiness and peer relationships, and 2) peer relationships were found to be the most influential factor in cognitive and affective happiness.

In the literature, there is definitely a pattern emerging that shows a positive relationship between happiness (at least perceived) and positive social relationships. My hypothesis is that conflict resolution skills improves friendships, leading to an increase in happiness.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Project Green Screen

Lights...camera...GREEN SCREEN! Five yards of green cloth, lots of staples, a tripod, and an iPad. That's all it took to transform a corner of our library into a fully functioning video studio.

But then what? Our technology integrator started doing some research on the best apps for green screen creation, and came up with Do Ink.

The App
It took a little practice, but my students figured out the process pretty quickly. Do Ink lets you create 3 "tracks" for your video:

1) the background (can be images from online, students can take pictures, can be videos)
2) the student talking to the camera
3) additional animations

The Process
I brought students to the library class and distributed iPads to groups of 2-3 students. I used my handy document camera to show the steps for opening and using the app. I had students open the app and then immediately start a new project and re-name it.

Important side note: Once Do Ink projects are saved, they are not editable. The app auto-saves pr…

Gut Check Part 2

Courtesy of https://gregmiller21stcenturyleadership.wordpress.com/tag/teacher-reflection/
A few weeks ago I listened to Cult of Pedagogy's podcast "Gut-Level Teacher Reflection" as I was walking my daily circuit around the neighborhood. I was so impacted I had to listen three times to the same podcast. I even tracked down the worksheets she mentioned because I was so excited about completing the reflection activity. I posted my response to her first gut-level question shortly after I listened to the podcast. Then life happened and I got busy with planning for the new school year. But here I am ready to continue working through the questions.
Question 2: Open up your plan book (or spreadsheet, or wherever you keep your lesson plans from the year) and just start browsing, paying attention to how you’re feeling as your eyes meet certain events. What days and weeks give you a lift when you see them, a feeling of pride or satisfaction? Which ones make you feel disappointed, irr…

Review: The Case of the Missing Marquess

The Case of the Missing Marquess by Nancy Springer
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Book Talk
Sherlock Holmes...world famous detective. We've all heard of him. But have you heard of his lesser known little sister, Enola? In "The Case of the Missing Marquess", Enola is faced with the disappearance of her mother. She goes on a great adventure to find her mother, and finds herself in the middle of ANOTHER disappearance. Will Enola find the Missing Marquess? Will she find her mother?

My Thoughts
This is a cute and quick read. I can see middle school students who like mysteries enjoying this series. Reminds me of the Benedict Society series.

My Recommendation
4/5 stars
Grades 5+

View all my reviews